13 Stunning Purple Succulents To Grow And Collect

13 Stunning Purple Succulents To Grow And Collect!

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Whether you are looking for a stunning succulent to add to your existing collection, or you are simply obsessed with the color purple, you can’t wrong with any of the amazing-looking succulents listed below. In this article, I provide you a list of 13 stunning purple succulents that are super easy to grow and care for, especially if are a beginner. These succulents make unique gifts and are also ideal for small DIY projects such as wall hangings and succulent hearts, succulent arrangements, and centerpieces… You can unleash your imagination!

Featured Image Credit @thriftysucculents

Echeveria ‘Purple Pearl’

First on our list of stunning purple succulents is Echeveria ‘Purple Pearl’, a lovely succulent with light purple hued pointy leaves with pink edges. The fleshy leaves have a waxy cuticle on the exterior forming rosettes that can grow in a variety of sizes and shapes up to 8 inches in diameter. The plant itself can grow about 6-8 inches tall. When the ‘Purple Pearl’ blooms, it produces tiny coral-pink flowers.

For its unique appearance and low maintenance is the perfect succulent to add to your garden, floral arrangements, and terrariums. Due to its popularity, growers and succulent enthusiasts have crossed the spices and created over a thousand stunning hybridized varieties. Not only Echeveria ‘Purple Pearl’ is beautiful, but is also a non-toxic and pet-safe choice if you are a pet owner.

13 Stunning Purple Succulents To Grow Or Add To your Collection
Image Credit @succulent_loves

Quick Care Tips

Light: ‘Purple Pearl’, like most Echeverias, enjoys bright indoor light or partial sunlight.  Echeverias struggle in low light conditions and need to receive direct sunlight for at least 4-5 hours every day to stay healthy but make sure not to overexpose them to constant direct intense sunlight, otherwise, the leaves will develop unattractive sunburn spots.

Water:  Echeverias, like most succulents, do not require much water. You’ll know when it’s time for watering when soil is dry to the touch. I always recommend the ‘soak and dry‘ method: water the soil until it is completely soaked letting the water stream through the drainage holes of the pot. Wait until the soil is fully dried out before watering again (this may depend on your location and type of container). Avoid overwatering because it quickly leads to root rot and the plant will end up suffering from pests and diseases.

Soil: Echeverias require a well-draining, porous growing medium to help keep excess moisture away from the roots. Standard cactus potting mixes are sufficient for Echeverias. Alternatively, you can create your own cactus soil by mixing three parts regular potting soil, two parts coarse sand, and one part perlite.

Echeveria ‘Afterglow’

Echeveria ‘Afterglow’ is a gorgeous hybrid succulent of Echeveria cante and Echeveria shaviana featuring large rosettes of powdery-lavender loosely packed leaves with bright pink coloring around the edges. ‘Afterglow’ sprouts during spring and summer, and in that time of the year, you’ll be able to spot bright orange flowers in hanging clusters on separate stems growing from underneath the foliage. It is an excellent choice for rock and succulent gardens given its deer resistance.

14 Sunning Purple Succulents: Echeveria Afterglow
Image Credit @jardim_arido

Quick Care Tips

  • Light: ‘Afterglow’ needs bright sunlight, at least 6 hours a day to maintain its colors and compact rosette form and at least. Because it’s not cold hardy,  it’s best to plant this succulent in a container that can be brought indoors if you live in a zone that gets colder than 20° F (-6.7° C).
  • Water: ‘Afterglow’ has typical water needs for a succulent and doesn’t like to be watered frequently. I always recommend the ‘soak and dry‘ method: water the soil until it is completely soaked letting the water stream through the drainage holes of the pot. Wait until the soil is fully dried out before watering again (this may depend on your location and type of container). Avoid overwatering because it quickly leads to root rot and the plant will end up suffering from pests and diseases.
  • Soil: As with other succulents, ‘Afterglow’ prefers well-draining potting soil. If you grow them in containers, make sure to choose pots with drainage holes to prevent root rot.

Echeveria ‘Black Prince’

Echeveria ‘Black Prince’, with its dramatic appearance, is another gorgeous hybrid of two other varieties, Echeveria shaviana, and Echeveria affinis. This evergreen succulent forms stunning rosettes of fleshy, pointy leaves in a brownish-purple color that can reach 3 inches (7.5 cm.) across, whereas the center of the plant maintains a bright green hue. Echeveria ‘Black Prince’ forms striking dark red flowers in late fall to early winter.

13 Stunning Purple Succulents To Grow And Collect! Echeveria Black Prince
Image Credit @thedaintygarden

Quick Care Tips

  • Light: ‘Black Prince’ needs bright sunlight, at least 6 hours a day to maintain its colors and compact rosette form and at least. Because it’s not cold hardy,  it’s best to plant this succulent in a container that can be brought indoors if you live in a zone that gets colder than 20° F (-6.7° C).
  • Water: Always remember that when it comes to watering succulents, less is more! Follow the ‘soak and dry’ method mentioned right above to avoid overwatering your ‘Black Prince’.
  • Soil: As for the majority of succulents, well-draining potting soil is the best choice that provides good air-flow for stronger and healthier root growth. For extra drainage, you can add mineral grit such as coarse sand, pumice, or perlite.

Echeveria ‘Perle Von Nurnberg’

Echeveria ‘Perle Von Nurnberg’ is a beautiful and easy to find hybrid succulent with soft lilac and pearlescent tones. Although the Echeveria genus is native to Mexico, this hybrid was born in Germany. It was created by Alfred Gräser in the 1930s by crossing Echeveria gibbiflora ‘Metallica’ with Echeveria elegans. It is the perfect succulent for beginners because is easy to care for and propagate.

13 Stunning Purple Succulents to grow and collect! Echeveria Perle Von Nurnberg
Image Credit @lilplantboss

Quick Care Tips

  • Light: Pearl of Nurnberg needs full to partial sun; 6 hours of light a day is ideal. This succulent is not cold hardy, so if you live in a zone that gets colder than 30° F (-1.1° C), you should plant it in a container that can be brought indoors.
  • Water: Less is more! Follow the above mentioned ‘soak and dry’ method to keep your succulent in good shape and avoid the devastating consequences of overwatering.
  • Soil: Potted plants prefer well-draining soil,  so choose a sandy soil like cactus/succulent potting mix.  Alternatively, you can create your own cactus soil by mixing three parts regular potting soil, two parts coarse sand, and one part perlite. Make sure to choose a container with drainage holes to prevent root rot.

Graptoveria ‘Debbi’

Graptoveria ‘Debbi’ (a.k.a ‘Debbie’) is a beautiful hybrid succulent, a combination of Echeveria and Graptopetalum amethystinum. It features rosettes of pastel gray-lavender fleshy and tightly packed leaves covered with a coat of ‘farina’ that gives it a powdery appearance and protects the plant. ‘Debbie’ can get up to 8 inches (20 cm) tall with a rosette up to 8 inches (20 cm) wide.

The tips of the leaves will turn pink in cooler months or when the plant is experiencing some stress. During the spring months, when blooming, you can spot lovely little orangy flowers, and you might see hummingbirds fly around your ‘Debbi’! It’s a perfect succulent to grow if you are a beginner for its low maintenance, either indoors in pots and containers or outdoors as part of a succulent or rock garden.

Graptoveria Debbie a Stunning Purple Succulents
Image Credit @contrivecreations

Quick Care Tips

  • Light: It does well in full to partial sun and needs at least 6 hours of sunlight a day.  Also, this succulent is not cold hardy, so if you live in a zone that gets colder than 20° F (-6.7° C), it’s best to plant this succulent in a container that can be brought indoors.
  • Water: ‘Debbie’  has typical water needs for a succulent and doesn’t appreciate to be watered frequently. I always recommend the ‘soak and dry‘ method: water the soil until it is completely soaked letting the water stream through the drainage holes of the pot. Wait until the soil is fully dried out before watering again (this may depend on your location and type of container). Avoid overwatering because it quickly leads to root rot and the plant will end up suffering from pests and diseases.
  • Soil: If you grow your ‘Debbie’ indoors, I recommend to choose pots and containers with drainage holes and use well-draining cactus and succulent soil with 50% to 70% mineral grit such as coarse sand, pumice, or perlite.

Graptoveria ‘Opalina’

Graptoveria ‘Opalina’ is a beautiful hybrid of Echeveria colorata crossed with Graptopetalum Amethystium with pale blue-green leaves that have a hint of pink tones on the leaf tips and margins and can grow up to 8 inches (20 cm) tall and up to 6 inches (15 cm) diameter.

Graptoveria ‘Opalina’ is a fast-grower and produces clusters of offsets at the base of the mother rosette. In late spring you’ll be able to notice the short, branching inflorescences bearing little yellow flowers with an orange center.

Graptoveria Opalina is a stunning purple succulent
Image Credit @thriftysucculents

Quick Care Tips

  • Light: ‘Opalina’ definitely loves the sunlight. If grown outdoors as part of a succulent garden, your ‘Opalina’ should be planted is in an area that gets 6 hours of morning sunlight.
  • Water: Graptoveria ‘Opalina’ has the same watering needs as most succulents: more often during the summer season and less often during winter when the soil tends to hold on to moisture longer.  Always remember that it is sensitive to overwatering and needs ‘watering with care’, otherwise the roots will rot and the plant will end up suffering from pests and diseases. Graptoverias, like most succulents, do not require much water. You’ll know when it’s time for watering when soil is dry to the touch. I always recommend the ‘soak and dry‘ method: water the soil until it is completely soaked letting the water stream through the drainage holes of the pot. Wait until the soil is fully dried out before watering again (this may depend on your location and type of container). Avoid overwatering because it quickly leads to root rot and the plant will end up suffering from pests and diseases.
  • Soil: If you plan to grow your Graptoveria ‘Opalina’ in a pot, it’s important that you choose a terracotta or clay one with drain holes to reduce the risk of overwatering and consequent roots rot. For best-growing results, use well-draining soil for graptoveria ‘Opalina’.  You can use cactus or sandy soil and add gravel at a 1:1 ratio to improve the level of drainage.

Pachyveria ‘Powder Puff’

Pachyveria ‘Powder Puff’ (a.k.a Pachyveria ‘Exotica’, Pachyveria ‘Kobayashi’) is a hybrid of two other species, Echeveria Cante and Pachyphytum Oviferum that can reach 6 inches tall (15 cm). It has beautiful powdery silver-blue leaves with pink tips when growing in full light or cold temperatures.

Pachyveria ‘Powder Puff’ sprouts during spring and summer, and in that time of the year you’ll be able to spot bell-shaped pinkish-orange little flowers in hanging clusters on a separate stem growing from the center of the plant. Read more about Pachyveria ‘Powder Puff‘ in this interesting article.

pachyveria powder puff is a stunning purple succulent
Image Credit @allthingssucc

Quick Care Tips

  • Light: To grow and stay healthy, this plant needs plenty of light and a temperature of at least 30° F (-1,1 C°), because ‘Powder Puff’ is not a ‘cold hardy’ and will die in frozen temperature.
  • Water: Pachyveria ‘Powder Puff ‘ does not require any special watering method.  It has, like all the other succulents, the amazing ability to retain the necessary water reserve inside its leaves. You can just follow the usual ‘soak and dry’ method described right above.
  • Soil: Potted plants prefer well-draining soil,  so choose a sandy soil like cactus/succulent potting mix.  Alternatively, you can create your own cactus soil by mixing three parts regular potting soil, two parts coarse sand, and one part perlite.

Sedum dasyphyllum

Sedum dasyphyllum (a.k.a Corsican Stonecrop, Blue Tears Sedum, Thick-leaved Stonecrop, Thick Leaf Stonecrop, Love and Tangles) is a low-growing groundcover sedum plant, which is ideal for dry, hot climates. Its tiny, dense leaves can vary from turquoise to silver and will blush lavender in full sun. It blooms in early summer with clusters of white star-shaped flowers on short stalks that attract pollinators.

Sedum dasyphyllum requires very little attention and can thrive in less than ideal conditions.  It’s perfect for growing on green roofs or can be used as part of rock and succulent gardens and as a lawn substitute. When grown as a house plant in containers or hanging baskets, it will eventually cascade over the edge creating a beautiful visual effect.

Sedum Dasyphyllum is a stunning purple succulent
Image Credit @the_simple_succulent

Quick Care Tips

  • Light: Sedum dasyphyllum grows well in full sun to partial shade. It is not cold hardy, although it is frost tolerant. Plant in an area of your garden that gets 6 hours of sunlight a day. If grown indoors, place in a room that gets a lot of sunlight, such as near a southern-facing window. Sedum dasyphyllum is also deer and rabbit resistant and is on the list of non-toxic plants to pets.
  • Water: Less is more! Sedum dasyphyllum is extremely drought tolerant, but regular water in the summer will encourage growth. If grown as a house plant, I suggest you use the ‘soak and dry’ method mentioned right above.
  • Soil: Sedum is easily planted and thrives well in sandy well-drained soil just like any other succulents. You may use a cactus or succulent soil and add some pumice, perlite, or grit added for extra drainage.

Sedeveria ‘Lilac Mist’

Among the most stunning purple succulents, a special place is taken by Sedeveria ‘Lilac Mist’, a gorgeous newer hybrid cultivar of Sedum and Echeveria which grows in clumps to 4 inches (20cm) tall. It features rosettes of compact chubby leaves in lovely shades of pastel colors, from silvery-blue to lilac and purple. The tightly packed leaves are covered with a coat of ‘farina’ that gives it a powdery appearance and protects the plant.  ‘Lilac Mist’ is ideal for small DIY projects such as wall hangings and succulent hearts, succulent arrangements, and bridal bouquets. It’s a great choice if you are a beginner and is a perfect addition to any current collection.

13 Stunning Purple Succulents To Grow And Collect: Sedeveria Lilac Mist
Image Credit @succiebaby

Quick Care Tips

  • Light: ‘Lilac Mist’ prefers full sun. Make sure to keep your plant in a bright room, where it can benefit from at least 6 hours a day of indirect sunlight.  But avoid direct sunlight that can easily result in sunburn, causing unattractive black spots on its sensitive leaves.
  • Water: ‘Lilac Mist’ has typical water needs for a succulent and doesn’t like to be watered frequently. I always recommend the ‘soak and dry‘ method: water the soil until it is completely soaked letting the water stream through the drainage holes of the pot. Wait until the soil is fully dried out before watering again (this may depend on your location and type of container). Avoid overwatering because it quickly leads to root rot and the plant will end up suffering from pests and diseases.
  • Soil:  If you grow your ‘Lilac Mist’ indoors, I recommend to choose pots and containers with drainage holes and use well-draining succulent soil with 50% to 70% mineral grit such as coarse sand, pumice, or perlite.

Aeonium ‘Zwartkop’

Aeonium is a genus including about 35 succulent plant species in the Crassulaceae family native to the Canary Island and very popular in the Mediterranean area. Aeonium Zwartkop is a  gorgeous, rosette-shaped succulent with beautiful spoon-shaped intense deep purple foliage in a wide range of textures and sizes reaching from 5-inch to 5-6 feet. Most aeoniums are monocarpic plants: after blooming, the rosettes will die. However, if the plant has produced side shoots, these will live on, otherwise, the entire plant will die.

Aeoniums do best in warm, dry climates and will not survive freezing temperatures. If you grow them in pots or containers, make sure to bring them inside when the temperatures are expected to drop significantly.  Aeoniums are commonly used as ornamental plants but are perfect for rock gardens too.

13 Stunning Purple Succulents To gro and collect: Aeonium Zwartkop
Image Credit @jardim_arido

Quick Care Tips

  • Light: Aeoniums thrive under partial shady areas to full sun, however, if you keep them under intense sun exposure, they can experience black spots due to sunburn. It’s always a good idea to protect them during the hottest summer hours with an umbrella o shade cloth.
  • Water: Most Aeoniums go dormant in summer and stay that way until the weather cools off in the fall. During dormancy, they don’t require watering often, just enough to keep them alive in extreme heat and dry conditions. If your Aeonium is outdoors and gets some rainwater, you don’t need to water it at all. However, when your plants are actively growing during the winter months, they need water from time to time and I find the ‘soak and dry’ the best watering method. You can read more about it by scrolling up this article.
  • Soil: As with other succulents, aeoniums prefer a sandy or regular well-draining potting soil. If you grow them in containers, make sure to choose pots with drainage holes to prevent root rot.

Gratopetalum Paraguayense (Ghost Plant)

Gratopetalum Paraguayense (a.k.a ‘Ghost Plant’ and ‘Mother Of Pearl Plant’) is a small evergreen succulent in the jade plant family, native to Mexico, with triangular, fleshy leaves in trailing rosette form. The pointed flat leaves are in gorgeous pastel colors and range from powdery blue-green to light pink or purple. Easy to grow and maintain, it is a popular succulent plant, perfect for hanging baskets or rock gardens, and totally pet-friendly!

Gratopetalum paraguayense is a stunning purple succulent
Image Credit @thepinklaui

Quick Care Tips

  • Light: Gratopetalum thrives in sunlight, approximately 4-6 hours of bright light per day.  When growing as a houseplant, it’s vital to keep it in a south or east-facing window.  If the plant does not receive adequate sunlight, it tends to stretch quickly.
  • Water:  Plants growing outdoors in full sun and summer temperatures will benefit from weekly watering, while houseplants may only need watering every other week or more depending on the climate you live in and how dry the soil gets. To assess when it’s the right time, I suggest you use the ‘soak and dry’ watering method described above.
  • Soil: Like the majority of succulents, the ghost plant needs good drainage to maintain a healthy root system and avoid root rot. Therefore, should be planted in well-draining soil.

Lithops Optica ‘Rubra’

13 Stunning Purple Succulents To Grow Or Collect: Lithops Optica Rubra
Image Credit @shabomaniac

Lithops (a.k.a Living Stones), a genus of succulents native to southern Africa, have a unique appearance of small colorful pebbles. These slow-growing plants are quite a popular novelty because are easy to grow indoors and look gorgeous in small pots and containers. They don’t have a stem and are made of thick leaves that grow in pairs. Lithops Optica ‘Rubra’ are very sought after and appreciated for their distinctive purple tone.

Lithops ‘Rubra’ bloom in the late autumn or early winter when a single white flower will be pushed up from the fissure between the pair of leaves. After the plant flowers, it goes into a period of dormancy during which at least one new body develops. Lithops are very fascinating succulents, non-toxic to humans or pets.

Quick Care Tips

  • Light:  Lithops do well when exposed to 4-5 hours of direct sunlight per day and partial shade in the afternoon, both indoors and outdoors. However, if you keep them under intense sun exposure, I suggest you protect them with an umbrella or shade cloth to avoid unattractive black spots due to sunburn.
  • Water: Watering lithops can be tricky. They have a yearly cycle of growth and you need to water according to the time of year. These little succulents need very little water and do not need to be watered in their dormant season, which is fall to spring. Water from late spring into summer by using the ‘soak and dry‘ method described above in this article.
  • Soil: Lithops thrive in compacted, sandy soil. If you grow yours in pots, make sure to use a well-draining grit-rich cactus blend of potting mix. If you don’t have a cactus mix, you can easily make your own by mixing 50% potting soil or compost with 50% grit material (perlite, pumice, lava rock, or coarse sand).

Anacampseros rufescens

Last but not least on our list of stunning purple succulents is Anacampseros rufescens, also known by its common names ‘Sunrise succulent’ and ‘Sand Rose’, a gorgeous, low-growing perennial succulent plant native to South Africa and grows in clusters that spread out in clumping mats.  The leaves of these small rosettes are pointy and narrow: dark green on the upper side with an intense purple shade beneath. During the spring-summer months, Anacampseros rufescens produces large purple or pink flowers.

Anacampseros rufescens is a stunning purple succulent
Image Credit @succulents.by.samantha

Quick Care Tips

  • Light: Anacampseros rufescens can be grown both indoors and out. When kept indoors place your plant in a bright room, where it can benefit from at least 4-6 hours a day of bright light. These plants will not tolerate poor lighting for prolonged periods of time. They will lose their vibrant colors and will revert to an olive green color. If you grow your plant outdoors, make sure is in light shade to full sun, in an area of your garden that gets 4 hours of sunlight a day. Keep in mind that anacampseros rufescens is not cold hardy, so if you live in a zone that gets colder than 20° F (-6.7° C), it’s best to plant this succulent in a container that can be brought indoors.
  • Water: Anacampseros rufescens has typical watering needs for succulents, but is sensitive to over-watering and needs to be watered with care. It’s best to use the “soak and dry” method described above, and allow the soil to dry out completely between waterings.
  • Soil: If you plan to grow your plant in a pot, you should choose a terracotta or clay one with drainage holes to reduce the risk of overwatering and consequent root rot. Terracotta or clay pots provide a healthy environment for most plants. For best-growing results, use a fast-draining cactus mix that allows for stronger root growth. For extra drainage, you can add 70% to 80% mineral grit such as coarse sand, pumice, or perlite.

Final Thoughts

Hope you enjoyed reading this article on 15 Stunning Purple Succulents To Grow And Collect and found it comprehensive and enlightening! If you like, feel free to leave a comment or share your knowledge on this topic in the section below.

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